My Dream School Essay Spm Sample

There is much work to do to improve schools across the globe, says Geetha Kanniah, 17, a Correspondent from Malaysia, who describes  attributes that she would like to see as common standards for all schools.

My dream school is first of all a school where life begins with the teacher who is full of passion and liveliness. The teacher not only grabs the students attention but keeps them on the edge of their seats wanting to know more. His or her enthusiasm ignites that spark of excitement that opens receiving minds to wider fields of knowledge. Such a teacher asks more questions from the students, explores with the students and is a friend to them. 

My dream school is a school where teaching methods vary from the use of contemporary technologies like robotics to out-of-class experiences.  Those experiences are important because they do not confine students to the four walls of a classroom. 

There would also be integrated learning of subjects both in the Arts and Sciences so that the education received would not be about confining but expanding. Given choices, students get a sense of freedom, can express opinions and will be more sociable. All these make them better persons in society, possessing a wide range of skills. 

My dream school would be complete with amazing facilities like classroom labs, pools, and gyms. A library and counselling centre would be at hand to enable students to be more familiar with their subjects and themselves. Studying in a hands-on environment allows students to use their five senses to gain knowledge. It moulds them to be excited about their abilities and excel with them. Also at hand would be a canteen stocked with healthy food. A balanced diet is vital for students who spend many hours in school. Clean, non-processed, nutritious food is a key feeding requirement for students. 

Foreign exchange programs in my dream school would create understanding and respect. They would satisfy curiosities and instil intercultural awareness. They would be open to all students, rich and poor. Including students from all parts of the world would make this education truly global. 

Sports would be given equal emphasis with academics. After all, education is not only for the mind but for the whole self – mentally and physically. Sporting activities instil a healthy lifestyle by encouraging students to be physically fit, emotionally strong, and have good self-esteem. They build team spirit, and at the same time encourage individuality. Through sports, people from different backgrounds meet and learn to respect each other. 

Academic subjects must be relevant. The syllabus would include significant impact fields like environmental studies, political views, and economic struggles. It would grab the attention of students and lead them to action. 

Improving schools would require international collaboration. Such cooperation would encourage dialogue and lead to common standards. Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the great engine of development. It is through education that the daughter of a peasant can become a doctor, that the son of a mineworker can become the head of the mine, that the child of farm workers can become the president of a great nation”.  

Education can bring a change in someone’s future as Mr. Mandela observed. The struggle to keep fulfilling that observation must be made by us. Students need to be inspired, amazed and be aware of endless opportunities. 

While school is the best thing that ever happened to mankind, there is still yet more to do.

 Photo credit: scottwills via photopincc

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About me:

I am a Malaysian, who looks for adventure and thrill, and is passionate about sports. I enjoy tennis, swimming, badminton and most recently, longboarding. I also spend a lot of my time with my camera, capturing as much as I can, while documenting them on my blog: journeywithacamera.wordpress.com.  

My travels give me the exposure to learn about the world. And to know and do more, I volunteer with different organizations, particularly in the marine field. My ambition is to be an explorer and to reach out to people.

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Opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth Youth Programme. Articles are published in a spirit of dialogue, respect and understanding. If you disagree, why not submit a response?

To learn more about becoming a Commonwealth Correspondent please visit: http://www.yourcommonwealth.org/submit-articles/commonwealthcorrespondents/

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Recently, I made a list of what I think my perfect school would look like. As I began developing the list, I was struck by two things: Firstly, how most of it was about making school more student-centered, and secondly, that I didn’t mention technology once. For me, this second trend bears a little more fleshing out. I would never say that there is no place for technology in education, far from it… But I think the place of technology is to support a more student-focused, relevant and engaging methodology. It is the ‘how’, not the ‘what’. For me, technology in the ideal school plays a supporting role – and it is a vital one, since my dream school relies on it to work, but it is still only there as a means to support the growth and flourishing of our students.

The specific technologies will change and evolve, but once a school has reliable and fast Internet connectivity, other technologies can grow around it. Just as if our students are given primary status over the syllabus, everything else will fall into place.

Finally, some of these ideas you will recognise as eminating from leading education gurus such as Sir Ken Robinson. For this, I make no apologies: I have embraced the learning revolution! With that in mind, here’s what I think the ideal school should be like: (Please feel free to comment and add your own below.)

The perfect school:

The primary focus is on tinkering, experimenting, problem-solving and making mistakes, rather than getting content into heads. ‘Remembering’ is very much a required skill, but it is closer to the bottom of the pyramid than it is currently in most schools. The whole school environment is challenging, supportive, caring and aimed at personal growth. Students are encouraged to feel as proud of their failures and the lessons learnt from them as they are of their successes. The teachers are passionate about upgrading their skills and embracing the most effective methodologies. The priority in lessons is about engagement and collaboration. There is a focus on helping students to discover their ‘element’, or the thing they feel they can spend their lives doing. (This is what ‘creativity’ in education really means.) There is no hierarchy of subjects. Art, Drama, Music and the Humanities are treated with the same reverance as Maths, Science and Languages. Subject boundaries are also blurred and intermingled. Lessons are customized to the individual, rather than a one-size fits all. Students have a significant amount of input into the design and delivery of lessons. Learning spaces are orientated and arranged around the comfort and learning of the student, not the priorities of the teacher. Enrichment opportunities, running both parallel to the school day, and taking place after school are an essential part of the learning process. I acknowledge that teachers can implement many of these in their own classrooms very quickly, but the most important ones require a systemic shift. I would like to challenge our school leaders to ponder this list and to attempt to put in place the policies and procedures required to make every school the perfect school.

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